Notice: Undefined variable: has_thumb in /home/testarky/public_html/wp-content/themes/archaeology/template-parts/header-tag.php on line 11

TAG: WWII Archaeology

  • December 7, 1941 January/February 2017

    A Timeline of the Attack

    Read Article
  • Letter From the Marshall Islands March/April 2015

    Defuzing the Past

    Unexploded ordnance from WWII is a risk for the people of the Marshall Islands—and a challenge for archaeologists

    Read Article
    (Courtesy Michael Terlep, Marshall Islands Historic Preservation Office)
  • Features May 01, 2011

    Archaeology of World War II

    Years after the end of the world's greatest conflict, new research reveals the true nature and extent of its impact

    Read Article
  • Features May 01, 2011

    The Story of YP-389

    Read Article
  • Features May 01, 2011

    Slideshow: The Wreck of the HMAS Sydney

    Read Article
  • Features May 01, 2011

    The Sinking of the HMAS Sydney

    The loss of the HMAS Sydney (II), pride of the Australian navy, has long been a source of pain and bewilderment. In waters off Western Australia in late 1941, following a successful tour in the Mediterranean, the Sydney encountered a ship claiming to be a Dutch freighter—actually the HSK Kormoran, a German raider that had menaced merchant ships for months.

    Read Article
  • Features May 01, 2011

    The Pacific Theater

    On June 15, 1944, a massive U.S. invasion fleet stormed the beaches of Saipan, the largest of the Mariana Islands.

    Read Article
  • Features May 01, 2011

    London's Air-Raid Shelters and Lost Homes

    During the Spanish Civil War, German and Italian forces had used aerial bombing raids to aid Francisco Franco's Nationalist side. In the run-up to WWII, British officials were frightened by the prospect of those very same tactics, so the U.K. passed legislation to begin digging air-raid shelters.

    Read Article
  • Features May 01, 2011

    The Archaeology of Internment

    Archaeology, with its unique ability to discover details of daily life often left out of personal journals and official histories, is now being used to document the lives of WWII's interned, among them more than 100,000 Japanese Americans and Japanese, and millions of Jews, Gypsies, Communists, criminals, homosexuals, and political prisoners.

    Read Article
Loading...